4 Nov 2004
The Gay Traitor 
Guest DJs at the Beautiful 2000 night at Fac 51 The Hacienda in the early 90s included people like John McCready, Manchester's favourite quizmaster (shurely shome mishtake, Ed.) Elliott Eastwick and Matt 'n' Pat from Central Station Design.

Matt recalls how they got the gig: "SO yeah this was a night me and our Pat were asked to do by Paul Cons AFTER he had heard about a night me and Pat played records at Polar's Bar (Swan Street, near the old Record Peddler, now Bar Fringe) in Ancoats, run by one of our mates: Lee Pickering (no relation to Mike). On the night we played everything from X-Ray Spex, The Ramones and Sex Pistols to George Formby, plus "Saturday afternoon who do we watch? .... IT'S U-NITED", an old Man Utd football team song from the 70s plus some old 78s records like Tommy Steele's Singing the Blues, and Winifred Atwell's 'Piano Boogie'. It was a packed night!"

Check out the new David Knopov pages in the Designers section. David did the graphic identity for Beautiful 2000 (although on a week-by-week basis Rebecca Goodwin and Murray Healy handled duties) and also designed covers for The Wendys.

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Peter Saville colour wheel
Biting Tongues

In the grey days of late 1970s post-punk Manchester, youth culture was a serious affair: every musical performance was measured mostly by the conviction of its delivery. The term 'New Wave' opened up free vistas where acquired skills could once again be exercised after punk's monochrome blur. It could be applied to anything from a James 'Blood' Ulmer record to the latest Throbbing Gristle release, Magazine to Swell Maps. Move outside that terrain into Sun Ra, Parliament, Frank Sinatra and Martin Denny, and your options were suddenly without limit...

Then came Tony Wilson's Factory Club (at the Russell Club in Hulme) offering an open invitation to experiment that was taken up when Ken Hollings, Howard Walmsley, Eddie Sherwood and a few others decided to make some noise to accompany their 16mm silent epic Biting Tongues. A further performance followed a few weeks later, when Colin Seddon and Graham Massey disbanded their Post Natals project and joined up. The film itself, a flashing series of negative images, became a memory; the name remained.

- extract from the LTM Biting Tongues biography

Factory Records

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