16 Feb 2006
'Keep Breathing' by The Durutti Column out 27 Feb 2006 
After a couple of false starts, the new album by The Durutti Column, 'Keep Breathing', will finally be in the shops on Monday 27 February.

Written and played almost entirely by Vini Reilly, the album is built out of ideas generated over the last year and was inspired by African hip hop, traditional Jewish music (Klezmer) and 1930's piano music by Art Tatum.

The 12 tracks were created over 3 months in a room "not much bigger than a broom cupboard" using only one microphone and whatever time and equipment Reilly and the album's programmer Ben Roberts had spare. This inventiveness adds to the richness of Reilly's amazing "honey wrapped in sandpaper" guitar playing.

The gorgeous song 'Maggie' samples a school choir he heard on the BBC 14 years ago, while other tracks such as the defiant 7 minute long love song, 'Let Me Tell You Something' are just as powerful and reflective, showing the positive frame of mind Vini was in when making the record.

The new album is more polished and less haphazard than his previous efforts and Durutti Column have also committed to touring it extensively in 2006, with a live band consisting of Keir Stewart, Bruce Mitchell on drums and John Metcalfe on viola.

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Thanks to Phil Jones.

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Peter Saville colour wheel
A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

The Durutti Column