2 Jan 2007
MOJO's Bumper New Year Factory Fest 
The new issue of Mojo (February 2007) features cover star Ian Curtis and three articles on him and Joy Division to coincide with the imminent March release of Control and reissues of their music. Contributions come from Jon Savage, John Robb, Pat Gilbert, Peter Hook, Mick Middles, Lindsay Reade, Tony Wilson, Vin Cassidy, Kevin Cummins, Martin O'Neill, Richard Boon, Pete Shelley, Terry Mason (ex-JD manager) and Genesis P. Orridge.

Plus, the rest of the magazine contains a veritable deluge of FAC-releated material:

- a cover compilation cd entitled 'Love Will Tear You Apart' and containing Susanna and The Magical Orchestra's interpretation of 'Love Will Tear Us Apart' and 14 other "hand-picked tracks of hurt, pain & despair"

- John Cale on producing Happy Mondays' Squirrel and G-Man... (how he had to face taunts from Shaun Ryder that the strongest substances he took during the recording sessions were tangerines)

- reviews of David Potts's 'Coming Up For Air' (3*) and the recent Manicured Noise compilation on Caroline True Records (4*),

- a full-page advert trails Manchester Weekend on MOJO's own digital radio station (Sky Digital 0182, Freeview 721, www.mojo4music.com)

- sadly, a feature entitled 'Freaky Dancers" does not include Bez...

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Peter Saville colour wheel
Biting Tongues

In the grey days of late 1970s post-punk Manchester, youth culture was a serious affair: every musical performance was measured mostly by the conviction of its delivery. The term 'New Wave' opened up free vistas where acquired skills could once again be exercised after punk's monochrome blur. It could be applied to anything from a James 'Blood' Ulmer record to the latest Throbbing Gristle release, Magazine to Swell Maps. Move outside that terrain into Sun Ra, Parliament, Frank Sinatra and Martin Denny, and your options were suddenly without limit...

Then came Tony Wilson's Factory Club (at the Russell Club in Hulme) offering an open invitation to experiment that was taken up when Ken Hollings, Howard Walmsley, Eddie Sherwood and a few others decided to make some noise to accompany their 16mm silent epic Biting Tongues. A further performance followed a few weeks later, when Colin Seddon and Graham Massey disbanded their Post Natals project and joined up. The film itself, a flashing series of negative images, became a memory; the name remained.

- extract from the LTM Biting Tongues biography

Factory Records

The Durutti Column