13 Jul 2007
CONFUSION: JOY DIVISION, ELECTRONIC AND NEW ORDER VERSUS THE WORLD 
BERNARD SUMNER



CONFUSION: JOY DIVISION, ELECTRONIC AND NEW ORDER VERSUS THE WORLD

By David Nolan



Bernard Sumner has read the manuscript of David Nolan's new book 'Confusion' and decided to contribute to the biography.



He's added his thoughts and observations to David's text, put many previously private matters into context and had a right to reply on some of the more controversial aspects of the book.



David Nolan says: "Bernard Sumner has read this book; it was vital that he be allowed to respond to some of the issues raised, particularly the very personal ones.



"To his credit, Bernard took a great deal of time and care offering his thoughts on the manuscript. As a result, where I had initially made a mistake, I have corrected it. Where his version differed to someone else's, I've included both. Where Bernard offers insight into something I could only have guessed at, I have added it verbatim.



"Unofficial biographies often have the sense that the author has the freedom to write whatever he or she wants, but is hampered by a lack of insider knowledge. Official ones have the story straight from the horse's mouth, but sometimes with the suspicion that deals have been struck and harsher words censored. This is an odd mix of both and is all the better for it.



Good luck for the future Bernard. Your past has been a fascinating puzzle to piece together."



David Nolan

Manchester

Summer 2007



PUBLISHED BY INDEPENDENT MUSIC PRESS ON 30 AUGUST 2007

ISBN:0-9552822-6-8 and 978-0-9552822-6-3 234mm x 156mm Paperback 240 pages

50 rare and unpublished photographs including 1 x 8 pp glossy b/w plates + 32 integrated pics 12.99 GBP

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A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

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