13 Jul 2007
CONFUSION: JOY DIVISION, ELECTRONIC AND NEW ORDER VERSUS THE WORLD 
BERNARD SUMNER



CONFUSION: JOY DIVISION, ELECTRONIC AND NEW ORDER VERSUS THE WORLD

By David Nolan



Bernard Sumner has read the manuscript of David Nolan's new book 'Confusion' and decided to contribute to the biography.



He's added his thoughts and observations to David's text, put many previously private matters into context and had a right to reply on some of the more controversial aspects of the book.



David Nolan says: "Bernard Sumner has read this book; it was vital that he be allowed to respond to some of the issues raised, particularly the very personal ones.



"To his credit, Bernard took a great deal of time and care offering his thoughts on the manuscript. As a result, where I had initially made a mistake, I have corrected it. Where his version differed to someone else's, I've included both. Where Bernard offers insight into something I could only have guessed at, I have added it verbatim.



"Unofficial biographies often have the sense that the author has the freedom to write whatever he or she wants, but is hampered by a lack of insider knowledge. Official ones have the story straight from the horse's mouth, but sometimes with the suspicion that deals have been struck and harsher words censored. This is an odd mix of both and is all the better for it.



Good luck for the future Bernard. Your past has been a fascinating puzzle to piece together."



David Nolan

Manchester

Summer 2007



PUBLISHED BY INDEPENDENT MUSIC PRESS ON 30 AUGUST 2007

ISBN:0-9552822-6-8 and 978-0-9552822-6-3 234mm x 156mm Paperback 240 pages

50 rare and unpublished photographs including 1 x 8 pp glossy b/w plates + 32 integrated pics 12.99 GBP

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Biting Tongues

In the grey days of late 1970s post-punk Manchester, youth culture was a serious affair: every musical performance was measured mostly by the conviction of its delivery. The term 'New Wave' opened up free vistas where acquired skills could once again be exercised after punk's monochrome blur. It could be applied to anything from a James 'Blood' Ulmer record to the latest Throbbing Gristle release, Magazine to Swell Maps. Move outside that terrain into Sun Ra, Parliament, Frank Sinatra and Martin Denny, and your options were suddenly without limit...

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