2 Oct 2007
Piece by Piece 
'Joy Division: Piece by Piece: Writing About Joy Division 1977-2007' by Paul Morley is now available for pre-order from Amazon.co.uk (and other booksellers). The book comprises Morley's complete writings on Joy Division, both contemporary and retrospective.

Amazon Synopsis

Joy Division are the perennial cult post-punk band. Author/TV broadcaster Paul Morley is the man who knew Joy Division best - he was the only journalist permitted to view Curtis' corpse, was present when Curtis suffered his near fatal epileptic seizure following a London concert in April 1980, and wrote extensively and evocatively of the 'mood, atmosphere and ephemeral terror' that enveloped this unique group and their doomed front man. These are his complete writings on Joy Division, both contemporary and retrospective. As he says, 'The more that time moves on, the more I have to say about them.' In addition to collecting all Morley's classic works about the band from the late 1970s/early 1980s, this unique book includes his eloquent Ian Curtis obituary and his hindsight pieces on the significance of the group, framed by an extensive retrospective essay. Contemporary elements include Morley's critique of the films "24 Hour Party People" - which told the story of the band's record label, "Factory" - and "Control", a new movie recounting the brief life of Ian Curtis, for which the author visited the set during production. Most movingly, Morley includes the original text that grew into his literary work, nothing, which parallels the suicide of Curtis with that of his own father. He also evokes the zeitgeist and the 'psycho-geography' of Manchester, which combined to produce the most uniquely intense rock group ever.

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Publication date: 15 November 2007
Paperback: 160 pages
Publisher: Plexus Publishing Ltd
ISBN-10: 0859654044
ISBN-13: 978-0859654043

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Biting Tongues

In the grey days of late 1970s post-punk Manchester, youth culture was a serious affair: every musical performance was measured mostly by the conviction of its delivery. The term 'New Wave' opened up free vistas where acquired skills could once again be exercised after punk's monochrome blur. It could be applied to anything from a James 'Blood' Ulmer record to the latest Throbbing Gristle release, Magazine to Swell Maps. Move outside that terrain into Sun Ra, Parliament, Frank Sinatra and Martin Denny, and your options were suddenly without limit...

Then came Tony Wilson's Factory Club (at the Russell Club in Hulme) offering an open invitation to experiment that was taken up when Ken Hollings, Howard Walmsley, Eddie Sherwood and a few others decided to make some noise to accompany their 16mm silent epic Biting Tongues. A further performance followed a few weeks later, when Colin Seddon and Graham Massey disbanded their Post Natals project and joined up. The film itself, a flashing series of negative images, became a memory; the name remained.

- extract from the LTM Biting Tongues biography

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