2 Oct 2007
Piece by Piece 
'Joy Division: Piece by Piece: Writing About Joy Division 1977-2007' by Paul Morley is now available for pre-order from Amazon.co.uk (and other booksellers). The book comprises Morley's complete writings on Joy Division, both contemporary and retrospective.

Amazon Synopsis

Joy Division are the perennial cult post-punk band. Author/TV broadcaster Paul Morley is the man who knew Joy Division best - he was the only journalist permitted to view Curtis' corpse, was present when Curtis suffered his near fatal epileptic seizure following a London concert in April 1980, and wrote extensively and evocatively of the 'mood, atmosphere and ephemeral terror' that enveloped this unique group and their doomed front man. These are his complete writings on Joy Division, both contemporary and retrospective. As he says, 'The more that time moves on, the more I have to say about them.' In addition to collecting all Morley's classic works about the band from the late 1970s/early 1980s, this unique book includes his eloquent Ian Curtis obituary and his hindsight pieces on the significance of the group, framed by an extensive retrospective essay. Contemporary elements include Morley's critique of the films "24 Hour Party People" - which told the story of the band's record label, "Factory" - and "Control", a new movie recounting the brief life of Ian Curtis, for which the author visited the set during production. Most movingly, Morley includes the original text that grew into his literary work, nothing, which parallels the suicide of Curtis with that of his own father. He also evokes the zeitgeist and the 'psycho-geography' of Manchester, which combined to produce the most uniquely intense rock group ever.

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Publication date: 15 November 2007
Paperback: 160 pages
Publisher: Plexus Publishing Ltd
ISBN-10: 0859654044
ISBN-13: 978-0859654043

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A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

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