6 May 2008
Blurt - The Factory Recordings 
From LTM Central:

LTM is pleased to present an archive CD of recordings made in for the legendary Factory Records label by cult band Blurt, the unclassifiable punk-jazz trio led by Ted Milton.

Formed in Stroud in 1979, Blurt consisted of Ted Milton (sax, vocals), brother Jake Milton (drums) and guitarist Pete Creese. Ted had already attracted the attention of Factory founder Tony Wilson as a puppeteer (!), and were invited to join the label. Blurt performed at several Factory showcase gigs in London between April and August 1980, and recorded one side of the double compilation album A Factory Quartet (FACT 24).

Although their anarchic shows and music drew rave reviews, Blurt were frustrated by delays in releasing their Factory recording, and the last minute loss of a Factory tour of Europe in October. A live album, Live In Berlin, was recorded in December 1980 and scheduled for release as a 10" on Factory Benelux, but cancelled after Blurt annoyed Wilson by comparing the Factory label to lifestyle boutique Habitat. The set was subsequently released as In Berlin on Armageddon, its memorable cover featuring a photograph of a pile of pink rubbish sacks.

Digitally remastered, LTMCD 2526 The Factory Recordings combines all tracks from A Factory Quartet and In Berlin, including Blurt favourites My Mother Was a Friend of an Enemy of the People, Ubu, Puppeteers of the World Unite and Cherry Blossom Polish. The booklet features archive images and detailed sleevenotes.

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Peter Saville colour wheel
A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

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