1 Aug 2010
Remade, remodelled and Retrofitted 
LTM has details of Section 25's 7th studio album Retrofit which is set for release on 13 September 2010. The 11-track set of remixes from throughout their career, clad in a cover by Beth Cassidy, includes a remix of Looking From A Hilltop by New Order's Stephen Morris and the brand new track Uberhymn.

Tracklisting

The Process
Looking From a Hilltop
Beating Heart
Desert
Uberhymn
Garageland
Dirty Disco
Girls Don't Count
New Horizon
Wretch
Another Hilltop (Stephen Morris mix)

Labels: ,

7 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Looking forward to the new album and gigs a lot! We're sure it's gonna be brilliant, even without Larry.

Ann & Manu
Belgium

05/08/2010, 14:28

 
Anonymous Eddo the dog. said...

Its a greatest hits album.
Oh well.

06/08/2010, 15:40

 
Anonymous Kelvin said...

All new recordings/remix I think Eddo, rather than a straight compilation.

11/08/2010, 09:59

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Spoke to James @ LTM about it on Tuesday and he seems really excited. Just booked my ticket for the Manchester gig in November, anyone else going?

Mark

12/08/2010, 23:19

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Come on get with the program Eddo! The album is all reworked material apart from 1 new track "Über Hymn". Retrofit was recorded before the untimely death of Larry Cassidy in February 2010, and sees the group revisit 10 key tracks from their estimable back catalogue, remade and remodelled using new technology, and closing with a compelling remix of Looking From A Hilltop by New Order member Stephen Morris.

14/08/2010, 08:30

 
Anonymous pkrpmusic said...

I don't give a flying rat's arse what's on it - I want it. It's Section 25 - it's going to be amazing.....

16/08/2010, 23:55

 
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Got my copy today and its fantastic, cant wait to see them live

Mark

28/08/2010, 05:42

 

Post a Comment

<< Home



- - - -


Peter Saville colour wheel
Biting Tongues

In the grey days of late 1970s post-punk Manchester, youth culture was a serious affair: every musical performance was measured mostly by the conviction of its delivery. The term 'New Wave' opened up free vistas where acquired skills could once again be exercised after punk's monochrome blur. It could be applied to anything from a James 'Blood' Ulmer record to the latest Throbbing Gristle release, Magazine to Swell Maps. Move outside that terrain into Sun Ra, Parliament, Frank Sinatra and Martin Denny, and your options were suddenly without limit...

Then came Tony Wilson's Factory Club (at the Russell Club in Hulme) offering an open invitation to experiment that was taken up when Ken Hollings, Howard Walmsley, Eddie Sherwood and a few others decided to make some noise to accompany their 16mm silent epic Biting Tongues. A further performance followed a few weeks later, when Colin Seddon and Graham Massey disbanded their Post Natals project and joined up. The film itself, a flashing series of negative images, became a memory; the name remained.

- extract from the LTM Biting Tongues biography

Factory Records

The Durutti Column