9 Sep 2010
End of the Mancunian Union of Bassists 
An official Freebass statement reads:

"It is with great sadness that just prior to the long awaited album release of It's A Beautiful Life we have to announce that the much anticipated Mancunian union of bassists, Freebass, is no longer a functioning group.

"Recent events have made Freebass entirely unviable as a band, and with this in mind, it has been decided that the project should be shelved, rather than placed on hiatus while members pursue their other interests.

"The band would like to take the opportunity to thanks friends and fans for their support and interest, especially on the UK tour in June 2010. We also hope that people will enjoy the album, which concludes five years of work and treat it on its own merits.

"No third parties were involved or harmed in the break up."

The announcement follows Andy Rourke leaving the group earlier in August and Mani's recent comments on Twitter.

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3 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Um, I guess that saves me from having to review it. A mixed bag at best.

09/09/2010, 20:34

 
Anonymous Irk The Purists said...

Uh oh. Trouble at t'mill. Just one thing- were they ever actually together at any point in time? If not, it's a bit of a stretch for Hook to say they've split. I don't recall the three of them *ever* sharing a stage, for example.

10/09/2010, 10:26

 
Anonymous surfjim said...

Was not all that impressed with the album anyway...glad I just got dinged for the digital version.

12/09/2010, 22:39

 

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A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

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