5 Nov 2010
The Whole of the Past 
Wim Mertens played a stunning 90 minute set plus encores at a very nearly packed out Kings Place in London tonight. Accompanied for nearly all of the evening by Eric Robberecht on violin, Mertens played piano and sang pieces from his extensive back catalogue (even the most avid Mertens obsessives were left wondering what some of the tunes were - fortunately the programme was printed out).

This was Wim Mertens's first proper UK appearance and the fans turned out in force with Hall One very nearly full for this concert as part of the London International Festival of Exploratory Music. Mertens's trademark high-pitched vocals and intricate piano playing sounded crisp in this acoustically perfect setting. Robberecht's violin playing was precise and the two seemed to have a very good rapport on stage, Mertens repeatedly thanking him and the audience in between numbers.

The main set lasted just over 90 minutes and was followed by four slightly more familiar pieces including one from The Belly of an Architect (the Crépuscule album which received a vinyl release as FACT 195 on Factory).

Main setlist (as printed in programme)

Apatride
Zing'up
Finding a People
Unless The Hand Obeys
The Whole of the Past
According to the Real
Its Maschinewesen
And Bring You Back
Without Example
Not at Home
Tactility
At Home
No Testament

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2 Comments:

Anonymous brandon said...

I was at the gig, It was amasing.I saw him in Brussels recently debut his latest album.
I was the northerner who shouted when's your next gig in England?
I hope it's soon.Nice to see Cerysmatic giving him a rightfull place on your site.Nice one.

07/11/2010, 22:40

 
Anonymous cerysmatic said...

Yes, it really was a great one and that was quite funny when you shouted out (don't think he was expecting it!). There's another review up on allgigs by my friend Paul and I'll link to it on the front page.

Hmmm, I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for him to come straight back but you never know...

09/11/2010, 22:39

 

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A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

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