22 Dec 2012
From Motion To Standstill 
Minny Pops' frontman Wally van Middendorp reflects on their comeback as the band enters another dormant period (via minnypops.com):

"It feels like only yesterday, but in fact it was January 2011 when all the band members got together to discuss a possible reformation of the mighty Minny Pops. It is now December 2012 and just over a week since we played our last gig (ever) at the Lexington in London. It was a very special night for me; I had fun and hope our audience had fun, too. I'm happy to have played live versions of FAC 31, OGEN 019, FBN 11 and FAC 57; we even checked to see if anyone could remember our classics Kojak and RU21.

"Loved the positive feedback we got after the show; enjoyed drinking a shot with our fans and giving them a kiss or a hug. One of the highlights was being asked 'Will you marry me?' by one of our fans via Twitter - how modern!

"So here we are today, and I have thought about it long and hard: Minny Pops began as a project and should end as a project. There were moments this year, on the road with our live line-up, that I felt like I was in a band. And it definitely felt like being in a band when we recorded our Waiting For This To Happen/Glistering single in one take at Eve Studios in Stockport. I am so proud of our new single; I am so proud of my fellow band members' performances and grateful to Tim Burgess for providing us with an opportunity to record two new tracks after nearly 30 years.

"But it ain't over yet. I am open to the unexpected - and to tell you the truth, the Minny Pops book will not close. We have just added another great chapter. Maybe another one in another 30 years?"

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A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

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