27 Jun 2014
Pauline Murray and The Invisible Girls [TWI 016] 
Pauline Murray and The Invisible Girls [TWI 016]

On 6 October 2014, Les Disques du Crépuscule presents a deluxe remastered edition of Pauline Murray and the Invisible Girls, the debut album by post/punk icon Pauline Murray, produced by revered sonic architect Martin 'Zero' Hannett.

Recorded at the famous Strawberry Studios in July 1980, the album offered epic electronic pop written by Pauline and partner Robert Blamire and marked a radical departure from their shared past in pioneering punk band Penetration. "This is sophistication," enthused Paul Morley in NME. "Lovely songs of anxiety, malaise and self-doubt." According to Melody Maker the album was "unquestionably a musical highpoint of this year or any other."

As well producer/arrangers Martin Hannett and Steve Hopkins (aka the Invisible Girls), the album features a stellar cast of guest musicians including John Maher (Buzzcocks) and Vini Reilly (The Durutti Column). Indeed Pauline Murray and the Invisible Girls presents almost a Factory record, exquisitely sleeved by Peter Saville and Trevor Key. Stand-out tracks include the popular singles Dream Sequence and Mr X, with the newly remastered Hannett tracks now augmented by a wealth of bonus material including non-album singles, b-sides and a John Peel session (1980).

The liner note is by Jon Savage. The double vinyl edition also includes a bonus CD featuring instrumental versions of all the album tracks (a must for students of Hannett's unique production sound), along with alternate takes of key singles.

"It's a bit of a missing link album," says Pauline today. "Written and recorded after punk, but before Martin Rushent and the Human League made airy pop respectable again. We chose the other Martin in 1980 because we wanted the incredible sounds he achieved for Joy Division and Magazine. Thundertunes, basically."

Vinyl album tracklisting (TWI 016)

Disc 1

A1. Screaming In the Darkness
A2. Dream Sequence
A3. European Eyes
A4. Shoot You Down
A5. Sympathy
A6. Time Slipping
B1. Drummer Boy
B2. Thundertunes
B3. When Will We Learn
B4. Mr X
B5. Judgement Day

Disc 2

C1. Searching for Heaven
C2. The Visitor
C3. Animal Crazy
C4. Dream Sequence II
C5. Two Shots
D1. Dream Sequence (Peel 3/1980)
D2. Shoot You Down (Peel 3/1980)
D3. Sympathy (Peel 3/1980)
D4. When Will We Learn (Peel 3/1980)

Disc 3 (bonus CD)

1. Two Shots (instrumental)
2. Mr X (instrumental)
3. Judgement Day (instrumental)
4. Thundertunes (instrumental)
5. When Will We Learn (instrumental)
6. Time Slipping (instrumental)
7. Sympathy (instrumental)
8. Shoot You Down (instrumental)
9. Drummer Boy (instrumental)
10. European Eyes (instrumental)
11. Screaming In the Darkness (instrumental)
12. Dream Sequence (instrumental)
13. Animal Crazy (long version)
14. Searching for Heaven (demo version)
15. Mr X (7" edit)
16. Dream Sequence (Amazon version)

Also available on double CD (TWI 016 CD) and digital download

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Peter Saville colour wheel
A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

The Durutti Column