24 Jan 2011
FAC 338 Want A Virgin by Northside 
FAC 338 Want A Virgin (aka Cool Idea) was a single which Northside recorded and which was intended for their second album. However, neither the single nor the album were released.

Dermo explains to Cerysmatic Factory what the single was about:

"The lyrics I wrote to the song are about a young man who decides to do a bank robbery on his own, (thinking that way he'd have less chance of being caught) in the hope of living a better lifestyle. He has no intentions of hurting anybody else, it's just that he's hurting so much himself. The lyrics were influenced by the song Bank Robber by The Clash and while I was growing up in Manchester, the attitudes of certain people that I knew. Want A Virgin is a refrain that I used (lifted off another Yellowman track of the same name) at the beginning of the song to emphasise it being somebody's first attempt, let's say his debut as a bank robber. Cool Idea being how his mind was working, in other words, it would be a cool idea to do a robbery, hurt no one, get away with it and lead a better life.

"The music is typical Northside but a bit heavier sounding in the guitars. Rex Sergeant (RIP) was working with us, producing this at Suite 16. I have a DAT copy of the song but it was never officially released on tape etc for Factory."

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Full details on FAC 338 Want A Virgin [includes full lyrics]

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A Certain Ratio

"Manchester, 1978. In the beginning there were four: Jez Kerr (bass), Martin Moscrop (guitar/trumpet), Peter Terrel (guitar/effects) and Simon Topping (vocals/trumpet). Four thin boys with a name borrowed from a Brian Eno record, the intense, drummerless quartet initially drew influence from Wire, Eno, the Velvets and Kraftwerk, and gained a manager in Anthony Wilson of Factory Records.

"May 1979 saw the release of their first ACR single, the dark All Night Party, although the sound and musicianship of the band would be transformed by the arrival of funky drummer Donald Johnson (DoJo) in August. Over the next few months the band gigged widely, often with Joy Division as part of Factory packages, and recorded demos with producer Martin Hannett as well as a Peel session. Their support slot with Talking Heads on their UK tour in December 1979 set David Byrne on a new course, and provided the compelling live half of their chic cassette package The Graveyard and the Ballroom. Post-punk, ACR now reflected the influence of Funkadelic, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, The Bar Kays and James Brown."

- intro to ACR Biography by James Nice (LTM)

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